News Release: 2018 Art Catalog Performance Surpasses Expectations

 

Expanded 1art Catalog News Graphic

Following the 2017 launch of his art catalog at Pixels.com and Fine Art America, content for the database of artwork titles by contemporary artist Aberjhani for sale online has more than doubled in 2018.

That news is notable because the catalog initially was intended to provide validation of the artist’s work as a writer, confirming his authorship of popular quotations by featuring them as the text for his Postered Chromatic Poetics products. However, responses to popular original photography, digital paintings, collages, and mixed media have inspired the creation of themed collections and individual prints. Among the most recent are “Suzannanian Algorithm Finger-Painted on an Abstract Wall” posters number 1 and 2, and “Harlem Renaissance Deja Vu Number 1.” These three items are also presented as commemorations of the Harlem Renaissance Centennial.

The Catalog So Far

Lovers of art and purchase agents for various businesses interested in keeping up with posts of new images by the artist can do so by subscribing to his Art-Notes Blog. Below is a list of brief snippets from and links to works currently available:

  1. Introduction to Artist behind Postered Chromatic Poetics
  2. Art-notes On All The Flowers We Meant To Give Each Other

Saturday, August 11, 2018, 11:34 AM

Use Discount Code GMKJUD for 15% OFF all Official Postered Chromatic Poetics artwork. “All the Flowers We Meant to Give Each Other” is a collage of photography, watercolor, digital painting, custom-designed matting, customized framing, and signature…

  1. Art-notes On Redbird Dreaming About Why Love Is Always Important

Saturday, August 11, 2018, 11:33 AM

“Redbird Dreaming about Why Love is Always Important” is a mixed media vertical-formatted work consisting of nature photography, layered oil, digital painting, …

4. Tribute To Survivors And Firefighters Battling Wildfires In California

Saturday, August 11, 2018, 11:33 AM

“Redbird Sifting Beauty out of Ashes” is the second print in the Redbird Series and my homage to those battling California’s historic wildfires of 2018. (Please …

Suzannian Algorithm Artnote 1 by Aberjhani

  1. Art-notes On Suzannian Algorithm Finger-painted On An Abstract Wall Number 1

Thursday, August 02, 2018, 10:29 AM

“Suzannian Algorithm Finger-Painted on an Abstract Wall Number 1” (which you can view by clicking the link at the bottom of this post) was inspired by conversations with the artist to whom it is dedicated: Suzanne Jackson. We discovered we both had …

  1. Art-notes On Suzannian Algorithm Finger-painted On An Abstract Wall Number 2

Thursday, August 02, 2018, 10:29 AM

I am profoundly grateful to the 3 women who modeled for “Suzannian Algorithm Finger-Painted on an Abstract Wall Number 2” (which you can view by clicking the link at the bottom of this post). Each is highly-accomplished in her own right and did not …

  1. Art-notes On Harlem Renaissance Deja Vu Number 1

Friday, July 20, 2018, 9:03 AM

The Harlem Renaissance is celebrated around the world as one of the most important cultural and political periods in African-American and American history. Next year, 2019, celebrations will get underway to mark the 100th anniversary of the Renaissance…

HarlemRen DejaVu Artby Aberjhani at Pixelsdotcom

  1. Art-notes On Song Of Love And Compassion

Friday, July 20, 2018, 8:59 AM

When I look at this artwork in its current form, I am reminded of the late art critic Bertha Husband’s description of the style and technique known as “real” painting. In her review of the ELEMENTAL Exhibit then on display at the Jepson Center for the…

  1. Art-notes On Lovers Dancing In The Golden Light Of Dawn

Friday, July 20, 2018, 8:56 AM

Lovers Dancing in the Golden Light of Dawn is one of those pieces I had to force myself to stop working on after years of experimenting with different ideas for it. A number of artists have told me about similar struggles deciding when to quit or …

  1. Art-notes On Flowers And Wings For Her Years And Tears

Friday, July 20, 2018, 8:51 AM

This print was almost titled Roses and Wings for Caring and Giving because of the subject which inspired it. Elderly matriarchs in most large southern families in America have traditionally been taken care of by younger female relatives when the time…

  1. Art-notes On Cultural Literacy For Lovers And Dreamers Number 1

Friday, July 20, 2018, 8:47 AM

This abstract print along with it corresponding piece, Cultural Literacy for Lovers amp Dreamers Number 2, was created out of recognition of the millions of people currently #seeking relief from war, starvation, terrorism, gun violence, drug addiction…

  1. Art-notes On Dare To Love Yourself Rainbow Poster 3rd Edition

Friday, July 20, 2018, 8:40 AM

Providers of some friendly feedback regarding the first two posters in my Official Dare to Love Yourself Series suggested that, for their specific tastes, the images were “pretty but kind’a tame.” I heard them well enough and for this third edition …

REDBIRD COLLECTION COVER ArtBy Aberjhani C2018

  1. Elemental Month Continues With Beautiful Irony

Friday, May 11, 2018, 10:57 AM

The current celebration of the 10th anniversary of ELEMENTAL, The Power of Illuminated Love, continues this week with the posting of two new print images: Portrait of the Poet as an Angel Drunk on Love, and, Black When Haitians Were Heroes in America…

  1. Thanks For All The Support

Monday, July 17, 2017, 12:41 PM

I have received a lot of encouragement from the great community at Fine Art America since joining a couple of months ago and today was notified about my first sale. It is for of a pack of Official Chromatic Poetics greeting cards titled Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge the Morning After Hurricane Matthew…

  1. Appreciating Beauty Of Magnificent Fountains Of The World

Monday, May 15, 2017, 1:24 PM

Fountains are among the most admired ornamental manmade structures because they combine the artistic beauty of refined sculpture with the precision of engineering and architecture. Celebrated examples can be found all over the world, including Savannah…

  1. Dare To Love Life On National Selfie Day And Always

Monday, May 15, 2017, 1:18 PM

The Dare to Love Yourself “movement” had nothing to do with National Selfie Day when it began to slowly develop ten years ago. The well-known quote–“Dare to love yourself as if you were a rainbow with gold at both ends.”– as many are now aware, …

  1. The Mysterious Wonder Of Birds And Winged Horses

Thursday, May 04, 2017, 9:55 AM

Who hasn’t at some point wished they could just fly off somewhere, like birds or other winged things, without dishing out cash for a ticket or becoming unwillingly intimate with pat-down procedures’ My homage to winged beings actually began a long time…

  1. Correcting Legacies Of Injustice

Thursday, May 04, 2017, 9:48 AM

One of the hardest questions posed by recent headlines in the U.S. has been: How do we come to terms in 2017 with legacies of an American past during which racism and other forms of social injustice were openly practiced’ It’s not a question that can…

  1. Expanded Perspectives On City Of Savannah, Georgia

Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 9:04 AM

I just added 3 images to a new FAA collection called Sojourns in Cosmopolitan Multicultural Savannah. Because the city is an odd mixture of diverse cultures framed within some intense southern history, the text provides a bit more background than…

  1. Art Plus Poetry Equals Amazing Magic Part Two

Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 12:32 PM

EDITORIAL NOTE: This is a continuation of the previous blog discussing changes in the publishing industry in regard to books of art and poetry. Publication of the ekphrastic art and poetry collection ELEMENTAL, the Power of Illuminated Love, proved …

  1. Art Plus Poetry Equals Amazing Magic Part One

Monday, April 17, 2017, 11:27 AM

Art and poetry have long functioned as a kind of team in my creative life. It is interesting at this point, while setting up the profile here on Fine Art America, to recall the different artists who have inspired me. I never intended to make attempts …

Bright Skylark News notes Aug 2018

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PRESS RELEASE: Summer 2018 kicks off with ‘Blossoms of Nonviolent Conflict Resolution’

Two new releases by Postered Chromatic Poetics creator Aberjhani made their debut on Pixels.com and at Fine Art America as part of May’s ELEMENTAL Month celebration, a third work of art posted June 14, and three more were released June 18. The new releases along with the artist’s entire online catalogue are now offered at 25% off with the use of Discount Code EXLTBU until July, 4, 2018, as part the Summer 2018 “Blossoms of Nonviolent Conflict Resolution” event.

The event takes its name, “Blossoms of Nonviolent Conflict Resolution,” from one of the new works slated for release June 18. The works released in May plus previews of those scheduled to go on sale next week show the author-poet-artist moving in some new directions with visual explorations of night-time urbanscapes, family life, and possibly most surprisingly a trio of abstract works.

Discount Code EXLTBU artsale2018 25 percent offThe page description for the digital painting titled  “Flowers and Wings for Her Tears and Years” states that it is a homage to caregivers. On his Facebook profile, the artist shared that the image was “modeled after a series of pictures taken by my friend, photographer and catalyst-counselor John Zeuli, an uncommonly beautiful soul who did me the honor of photographing me for a gallery of works featuring fellow poet Coleman Barks (celebrated foremost interpreter of works by Jalal al-Din) and others.”

His night-time urbanscape, titled “Moon on Fire over Downtown Savannah” represents a departure from previous depictions of the historic city while further verifying the uncanny mystique that draws millions of tourists to it every year. (The current National Beta Club Convention being held in Savannah is only one example.)

The mixed media digital painting “Of Time and the Savannah River Bridge” is an obvious type of departure in terms of the style employed. But it also shows the artist expanding his public commentary via art –as he did with the popular print “Savannah River Bridge the Morning After Hurricane Matthew No. 2”–on the controversial name of the Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge. The text for his collection of bridge images reads as follows:

“There is no ignoring the many social justice calls for renaming the Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge so its nomenclature better reflects our changing more inclusive modern times. A lot of dedicated mindful people are working hard to make that happen. But that doesn’t mean we have to wait to celebrate the aesthetic triumph and majestic beauty of the bridge itself.”

The artist further proposed some of the new canvases are, “like painted prayers offered on behalf of all those millions of people in the world today so desperately on the run from one country to another, or one history to another, trying to save their own lives and the lives of people they love. I’m also reminded of the too-many victims of gun violence in schools and homes. Our fellow human beings endure so much horror and yet through their faith and courage and sometimes triumphs, they gift us with amazing inspiring beauty.”

A number of the new images already unveiled have featured on the front pages of several groups at Fine Art America, including: Beauty in Art, Contemporary,  Social Justice Awareness and Unity, and Digital Art.

–Bright Skylark News Notes

The 2015 Bid for Power and History in Savannah (Georgia, USA) – Bright Skylark Literary Productions

There’s a lot at stake when it comes to casting a vote for the mayor of Georgia’s first city. Candidates not only stand to make history but to shape it some very powerful ways. (photo of Edna B. Jackson courtesy of Diva Magazine)

Journalist Patricia C. Stumb, in a 1999 Connect Savannah news magazine story titled “Peace, love & blessings…,” wrote of how I “found worldly consciousness in the heart of [my] hometown.” Her observation was surprisingly precise because during that period while living in Savannah, Georgia, I had indeed become more aware of my hometown on the global scale of things. I had also become more cognizant of myself as an author whose influences and inspirations tended often to derive from regions far beyond it.

However, expanded consciousness or not, there was no such thing as overlooking the profound thematic shift that occurred in the city’s history when Floyd Adams became its first African-American mayor in 1996. That event prompted the composition of these lines:

By way of an African wind
a letter came today.
It was not scribbled over
Hallmark fantasies or
popcultural postcards;
it was engraved on sweat-dyed scrolls
manufactured by centuries
of anguish, struggle, determination.
––from the poem A Letter Came Today (I Made My Boy Out of Poetry)

The thematic transition grew even more powerful in 2003 with the election of Otis Johnson as mayor of the city and in 2011 when Edna Branch Jackson won the office. Up until this point, too much of the story of African Americans in Savannah had been one of a people continuously oppressed and suppressed by history itself. Different industries (such as film) and individuals benefited economically from that history but Blacks native to the city have rarely done so to any significant degree.

The Re-Historicization of a Narrative

The elections of Adams, Johnson, and Jackson created a thematic evolution that has helped the city prepare for even more dramatic and culturally inclusive demographic shifts already in progress. Call it the re-historicization of a narrative that dates back at least to late 1800s Reconstruction.

Please enjoy the complete essay at this link: Source: The 2015 Bid for Power and History in Savannah (Georgia, USA) – Bright Skylark Literary Productions

Many Inspired by Amazing Grace of Young Brotherhood Advocate Semaj Clark

Advocate for brotherhood Semaj Clark giving thumbs Up GoFundSemajBrotherhood ambassador and advocate for nonviolent conflict resolution Semaj Clark. (photo courtesy of Gofundme)

The cost of the public health crisis of gun violence in America grows more expensive by the day. It has surpassed even the mega-millions of dollars that gun advocates such as members of the National Rifle Association casually spend to counter efforts to implement the most basic sensible forms of responsible gun legislation.

The greater cost is in that of lives lost or irreparably damaged. Sometimes the damage takes the form of psychological trauma experienced by those who have lost loved ones to the violence and for whom monetary compensation does nothing to ease their inconsolable grief. Recent reports on an attempt by Gloria Darden, mother of the late Freddie Gray, to commit suicide, underscores that point. Moreover, it represents only one example.

What happened to Semaj Clark when he chose to speak out against the violence he saw destroying too many young lives represents another deeply troubling instance. Yet his story is one which this compelling millennial crusader for brotherhood refuses to allow to be defined by the word “tragedy.” Considering what doctors have said about the likely results of the gun violence inflicted upon Semaj, his amazing grace is truly inspiring.

To learn about Semaj Clark’s extraordinary story please click the link below:

Millennial on a Mission to Promote Brotherhood

Aberjhani

5 Ways to be Geniuses Together: Celebrating Ja Jahannes

Quote by Ja A. Jahannes with art graphic by Postered Poetics and Aberjhani.
“Unless we learn” quote by Ja A. Jahannes (with art graphic by Postered Poetics)

One self-penned definition of the word genius is: a focused intensification of individual intelligence resulting in works of exemplary creativity, visionary leadership, or uncommon spiritual depth and beauty. This definition is perhaps a fitting one to describe much of the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Ja A. Jahannes, who was born August 25, 1942. in Baltimore, Maryland, and died in Savannah, Georgia, on July 5, 2015.

As recently as April 28, Jahannes (as he was known to many of his friends) had started a new blog in which he stated his intentions as follows:

“This is the beginning of me putting my thoughts, observations, queries, photos and insights in one place for present, current, and past generations (it could happen…time travel) to read and witness that I made some small, if not minuscule, contribution to Planet Sol-3.”

Unfortunately, battles with illness and the drive to continuously produce creative works did not leave much time or energy for the planned blog entries. That does not, however, mean there was or is anything at all “minuscule” about the contributions Jahannes managed to make to the world community before leaving it. Proof of that statement may be found in the announcement that his latest play, “Thought My Soul Would Rise and Fly,” will be performed July 26, 2015, at the Jewish Educational Alliance in Savannah.

Indeed, anyone even vaguely acquainted with his name find themselves astonished when learning about his prodigious output as a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, an educator, minister, proud alumnus of Lincoln University (Pennsylvania), composer, playwright, poet, novelist, essayist, photographer, family man, community leader, publisher, and public intellectual.

Please enjoy the complete article by clicking here:
5 Ways to be geniuses together: Celebrating Ja Jahannes (part 1 of 3: the man) – National African-American Art | Examiner.com.

Shifting Points of View and the Massacre in Charleston | Aberjhani | LinkedIn

#PrayersForCharleston #StandingWithCharleston #Aberjhani

News about homegrown and foreign terrorism receives a lot of broadcast media airtime and focused attention online. It has become a pervasive theme in the developing story of our 21st century lives. Still, it is not something with which most us can ever afford to become so comfortable that we take it for granted in the same way that we take doing the laundry or drinking a cup of coffee for granted. Nor should we.

I almost refused to allow myself to believe the reports about the shooting Wednesday at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, SC. Six women and three men shot dead by one Dylann Storm Roof. I almost succeeded in believing the massacre had not occurred so close to where I grew up in Savannah, Georgia. Then I reminded myself that denial of evident truth is also something we cannot afford to indulge in today’s socially and politically tumultuous climate.

Heeding that reality, I found myself meditating on words from my essay Creative Flexibility and Annihilated Lives (published last year in the fourth edition of Charter for Compassion’s Words and Violence online curriculum resource):

Shifting Points of View and the Massacre in Charleston | Aberjhani Author-Poet-Literary-Consultant | LinkedIn.

5 Eye-opening Books about Slavery in Savannah (part 1)

Georgia Historical Society marker citing
Georgia Historical Society marker citing “The Weeping Time,” a.k.a. the “Largest Slave Sale in Georgia History” held in Savannah.
(photo courtesy of Waymark)

Two of the most acclaimed movies of the past decade, 12 Years a Slave and Django Unchained, have focused on the degradation, inhumanity, and absurdity associated with slavery as it was once practiced in the United States. Those who are surprised by this film genre’s ability to continue to command the attention of audiences around the world might want to consider the fact that various forms of forced servitude are very real in 2015.

In addition, just as the year 2011 marked the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the American Civil War, 2015 commemorates the sesquicentennial of the war’s end. It is therefore also the official end of slavery in the United States and reason enough for movies that remind viewers why so many fought against it then and why so many, acknowledged or not, are doing so now. For all intended purposes, the precise date of the end of the Civil War was April 9, 1865, when General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia. Some, however, maintain it did not end until Confederal Gen. Edmund K. Smith’s concession on June 2, 1865.

A Functional Metaphor

Slavery as it was known in the past serves as a functional metaphor for the human trafficking that remains to be corrected in the present. Current estimates provided by the Walk Free Foundation place the estimated number of people enslaved across the globe at 35.8 million. The foundation has drawn some heat regarding the accuracy of this figure and how they derived at it. In its own defense, the organization’s website states the following:

“Measuring modern slavery is a very difficult undertaking due to the hidden nature of this crime. Surveys represent the most accurate method for estimating the numbers of people living in modern slavery…. Data from a total of 19 countries were obtained from random sample surveys, including the seven Gallup survey countries.”

Criticisms of methodological precision to the side, even the fact that organization members dispute an exact number of millions of people enslaved in modern-day times is something so incredulous that many prefer to pretend there are no real numbers at all.

For the TedTalks photography video on modern-day slavery and to read the complete essay by Aberjhani please click this link:
5 Eye-opening books about slavery in Savannah (part 1 of 2) – National African-American Art | Examiner.com.