Dancing with David Bowie under the Serious Moonlight – Bright Skylark Literary Productions

David Bowie on 1983 set of LET’S DANCE video with dancers Terry Roberts (left) and Joelene King (center). (Photo from bowiedownunder.com originally published in 1983 Serious Moonlight Tour booklet)

Dance is a political strategy that says “yes” to life as opposed to the corporate and terroristic manipulations that so eagerly promote polarization and glorify violent entries into death. Simply put, that is one important reason David Bowie’s 1983 Let’s Dance video (directed by David Mallet) is one of my all-time favorites. Through its subtle acknowledgment of the plight of Aboriginals in Australia, the late great Bowie Jan 8, 1947 – Jan 10, 2016) made two very important statements:

The first statement is very similar to that made by Leonardo DiCaprio when accepting a 2016 Golden Globe Award for his performance in the movie Revenant. It is namely this: the lives of indigenous and “minority” people are something much more than hindrances to a given company’s or government’s preferred agenda. As such, colonizing them (something which can be done in many different ways: economically, politically, socially, etc) or marginalizing the same is not the “acceptable option” so many seem to believe it is.

For the complete post with photos and videos please click the Source: Dancing with David Bowie under the Serious Moonlight – Bright Skylark Literary Productions

Shifting Points of View and the Massacre in Charleston | Aberjhani | LinkedIn

#PrayersForCharleston #StandingWithCharleston #Aberjhani

News about homegrown and foreign terrorism receives a lot of broadcast media airtime and focused attention online. It has become a pervasive theme in the developing story of our 21st century lives. Still, it is not something with which most us can ever afford to become so comfortable that we take it for granted in the same way that we take doing the laundry or drinking a cup of coffee for granted. Nor should we.

I almost refused to allow myself to believe the reports about the shooting Wednesday at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, SC. Six women and three men shot dead by one Dylann Storm Roof. I almost succeeded in believing the massacre had not occurred so close to where I grew up in Savannah, Georgia. Then I reminded myself that denial of evident truth is also something we cannot afford to indulge in today’s socially and politically tumultuous climate.

Heeding that reality, I found myself meditating on words from my essay Creative Flexibility and Annihilated Lives (published last year in the fourth edition of Charter for Compassion’s Words and Violence online curriculum resource):

Shifting Points of View and the Massacre in Charleston | Aberjhani Author-Poet-Literary-Consultant | LinkedIn.

Report on 2011 International Year Part 6: International Day to Eliminate Racial Discrimination

Crowd in Sharpeville, South Africa, commemorate those who died in the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960. 

Crowd in Sharpeville, South Africa, commemorate those who died in the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960.

Monday, March 21, 2011, will mark the 45th anniversary of the United Nations’ (UN) observance of the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. In observance of the day, the UN has previously hosted such events as webcasts that address ways people can help end racism and encouraged the composition of essays, photo projects, and the publication of articles that promote the issue.

The observance of International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is somewhat different this year, however, because the UN has declared 2011 as the International Year for People of African Descent. In a public statement issued by UN General Secretary Ban Ki-moon regarding the event, he said:

“This year, the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is devoted to combating discrimination faced by people of African descent. This focus reflects the United Nations General Assembly’s proclamation of 2011 as the International Year for People of African Descent.”

In modern societies composed of many ethnic groups, such as Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Jews in the United States, to some it might seem odd to place such a singular emphasis on people of African descent. Ki-moon cited the following reason for this specific focus at this time:

“The discrimination faced by people of African descent is pernicious. Often, they are trapped in poverty in large part because of bigotry, only to see poverty used as a pretext for further exclusion. Often, they lack access to education because of prejudice, only to have inadequate education cited as a reason to deny them jobs. These and other fundamental wrongs have a long and terrible history…”

Remembering the Sharpeville Massacre

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination began as a commemoration of the Sharpeville Massacre that took place in South Africa, March 21, 1960. On that day, police shot and killed some 69 people involved in a peaceful protest against the apartheid “pass laws” in the country. Six years later, the UN General Assembly proclaimed the day as a UN Day of observance to continue the struggle against racism and to honor the lives of those killed.

To read more please click this link: http://www.examiner.com/african-american-art-in-national/report-on-2011-international-year-part-6-day-to-eliminate-racism

by Aberjhani

Continue the discussion on redroom.com